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Kālāma Sutta - Das Buddhistische Haus - Berlin Frohnau

The Kālāma-Sutta
(Anguttara Nikāya III. 65)

 

(§ i) Thus have I heard: On a certain occasion the Exalted One, while going his rounds among the Kosalans with a great company of monks, came to Kesaputta, a district of the Kosalans.

Now the Kālāmas of Kesaputta heard it said that Gotama the recluse, the Sakyan´s son who went forth as a wanderer from the Sakyan clan, had reached Kesaputta.

And this good report was noised abroad about Gotama, that Exalted One, thus: 'He it is, the Exalted One, Arahant, a Fully Enlightened One, perfect in knowledge and practice, and so forth.' It were indeed a good thing to get sight of such arahants!

So the Kālāmas of Kesaputta came to see the Exalted One. On reached him, some saluted the Exalted One and set down at one side: some greeted the Exalted One courteously, and after the exchange of greetings and courtesies sat down at one side: some raising their joined palms to the Exalted One sat down at one side: some proclaimed their name and clan and did likewise; while others without saying anything just sat down at one side. Then as they thus sat the Kālāmas of Kesaputta said this to the Exalted One:

(§ ii) "Sir, certain recluses and brāmins come to Kesaputta. As to their own view, they proclaim and expound it in full: but as to the view of others, they abuse it, revile it, depreciate and cripple it. Moreover, sir, other recluses and brāhmins, on coming to Kesaputta, do likewise. When we listen to them, sir, we have doubt and wavering as to which of these worthies is speaking truth and which speaks falsehood."

(§ iii) "Yes, Kālāmas, you may well doubt, you may well waver. In a doubtful matter wavering does arise.

Now look you, Kālāmas. Be ye not misled by report or tradition or hearsay. Be not misled by proficiency in the collections, nor by mere logic or inference, nor after considering reasons, nor after reflection on and approval of some theory, nor because it fits becoming, nor out of respect for a recluse (who holds it). But, Kālāmas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unprofitable, these things are blameworthy, these things are censured by the intelligent; these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to loss and sorrow, - then indeed do ye reject them, Kālāmas.

(§ iv) Now what think ye, Kālāmas? When greed arises within a man, does it arise o his profit or to his loss?"

"To his loss, sir."

"Now, Kālāmas, does not this man, thus become greedy, being overcome by greed and losing control of his mind, - does he not kill a living creature, take what is not given, go after another´s wife, tell lies and lead another into such a state as causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?"

"He does, sir."

(§ v) "Now what think ye, Kālāmas? When malice arises within a man, does it arise to his profit or to his loss?"

"To his loss, sir."

"Now, Kālāmas, does not this man, thus become malicious, being overcome by malice and losing control of his mind, - does he not kill a living creature, take what is not given, go after another´s wife, tell lies and lead another into such a state as causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?"

"He does, indeed, sir."

(§ vi) "Now what think ye, Kālāmas? When illusion arises within a man, does it arise to his profit or to his loss?"

"To his loss, sir."

"And does not this man, thus deluded ... likewise mislead another to his loss and sorrow for a long time?"

"He does, sir."

(§ vii) "Well then, Kālāmas, what think ye? Are these things are profitable or unprofitable?"

"Unprofitable, sir."

"Are they blameworthy or not?"

" "Blameworthy, sir."

"Are they censured by the intelligent or not?"

"They are censured, sir."

"If performed and undertaken, do they conduce to loss and sorrow or not?"

"They conduce to loss and sorrow, sir. It is just so, methinks."

(§ viii) "So then, Kālāmas, as to my words to you just now: 'Be ye not misled by report or tradition or hearsay. Be not misled by proficiency in the collections, nor by mere logic or inference, nor after considering reasons, nor after reflection on and approval of some theory, nor because it fits becoming, nor out of respect for a recluse (who holds it). But, Kālāmas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unprofitable, these things are blameworthy, these things are censured by the intelligent; these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to loss and sorrow, - then indeed do ye reject them ', such was my reason for uttering those words.

(§ ix) Come now, Kālāmas, be ye not ... so misled. But if at any time ye know of yourselves: These things are profitable, they are blameless, they are praised by the intelligent: these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to profit and happyness, - then, Kālāmas, do ye, having undertaken them, abide therein.

(§ x) Now what think ye, Kālāmas? When freedom from greed arises in a man, does it arise to his profit or his loss?"

"To his profit, sir."

"Does not this man, not being greedy, not overcome by greed, having his mind under control, - does he not cease to slay and so forth: does he not cease to mislead another into a state that shall be to his loss and sorrow for a long time?"

"He does, sir."

(§ xi) "Now what think ye, Kālāmas? When freedom from malice arises within a man, does it arise to his profit or his loss?"

"To his profit, sir."

"Does not this man, not being malicious, not being overcome by malice, but having his mind under control, - does he not cease to slay and so forth? Does he not lead another into such a state as causes his profit and happyness for a long time?"

"He does. sir."

(§ xii) "And is it not the same with regard to freedom from illusion?"

"Yes, sir."

(§ xiii) "Then, Kālāmas, what think ye? Are these things profitable or unprofitable?"

"Profitable, sir."

"Are they blameworthy or not?"

"They are not, sir."

"Are they censured or praised by the inteeligent?"

"They are praised, sir."

"When performed and undertaken, do they conduce to happiness or not?"

"They do conduce to happiness, sir. It is just so methinks."

(§ xiv) "So then, Kālāmas, as to my words to you just now: 'Be ye not misled by report or tradition or hearsay. Be not misled by proficiency in the collections, nor by mere logic or inference, nor after considering reasons, nor after reflection on and approval of some theory, nor because it fits becoming, nor out of respect for a recluse (who holds it). But, Kālāmas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unprofitable, these things are blameworthy, these things are censured by the intelligent; these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to loss and sorrow, - then indeed do ye reject them ', such was my reason for uttering them.

(§ xv) Now, Kālāmas, he who is an Ariyan disciple freed from coveting and malevolence, who is not bewildered but self- controlled and mindful, with a heart possessed by goodwill, by compassion ... possessed by sympathy, by equanimity (that is widespread, grown great and boundless, free from enmity and oppression), - such an one abides suffusing one quarter of the world therewith, likewise the second, third and fourth quarter of the world. And in like manner above, below, across, everywhere, for all sorts and conditions, he abides suffusing the whole world with a heart possessed by ... equanimity that is widespread, grown great and boundless, free from enmity and oppression. By that Ariyan disciple whose heart is thus free from enmity, free from oppression, untainted and made pure, by such in this very life four comforts are attained, thus:

(§ xvi) 'If there be a world beyond, if there be fruit and ripening of deeds done well or ill, then, when body breaks up after death, I shall be reborn in the Happy Lot, in the Heaven World.' This is the first comfort he attains.

'If, however, there be no world beyond, no fruit and ripening of deeds done well or ill, yet in this very life do I hold myself free from enmity and oppression, sorrowless and well.' This is the second comfort he attains.

'Though, as result of action, ill be done by me, yet do I plan no ill to anyone. And if I do no ill, how can sorrow touch me?' This is the third comfort he attains.

'But if, as result of action, no ill be done by me, then in both ways do I behold myself utterly pure.' This is the fourth comfort he attains.

Thus, Kālāmas, that Ariyan disciple whose heart is free from enmity, free from oppression, untainted and made pure, in this very life attains these four comforts."

(§ xvii) "So it is, Exalted One. So it is, Wellfarer. That Ariyan disciple ... in this very life attains these four comforts."
(And they repeated all that had been said.)

"Excellent, sir! We here do go refuge to the Exalted One, to Dhamma and to the Order of Monks. May the Exalted One accept us as lay-followers from this day forth so long as life shall last, who have so taken refuge."

 

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